Finding a spiritual ‘home’ stateside

In two days we will have been away from our longtime home of London for a month. It’s been a month of visits to the swimming pool, niece’s birthday parties, road trips and catching up on American food (in place of American TV which is awful!). Our health insurance through Obamacare has finally come through, though we haven’t been told how to pay (and my word will we pay, even in spite of the subsidy – I miss you NHS!). Our daughter is on the list for Medicaid (didn’t ever think we’d be applying for that, but grateful it’s an option while we get settled) which will hopefully come through soon. I’m so thankful that the people behind her medical coverage are actual people and are willing to go off the usual script with us as our circumstances are a little irregular.

wild goosing.JPGWe have gone to three different Christian gatherings in an attempt at finding a Christian community who meet regularly. One was the Wild Goose Festival, set in the beautiful mountains outside Ashville, alongside the French Broad River where I got to dip my toes. It’s inspired by Greenbelt, a UK festival we love. Having returned to the southeast – I still think of it as the SOUTH – at a time of such turmoil politically and with so many injustices being made glaringly obvious, it was a priority of ours to get together with Jesus followers who were more along our wavelength. Having been brought up conservative Baptist by Southerners I had no idea, honestly, that you could be a Democrat/liberal and be a Christian. So returning to the states as the black sheep with my new identity, finding a people group to feel at home with was at the top of my list. And it was a great experience.

Wild Goose was much more basic than Greenbelt, with less on offer during the evenings, but the daytime talks were second to none. Unfortunately what was lacking was a clear space for meeting new people and hatching new plans. It was very program heavy, and the only open space we found was a lovely cafe providing cheap food for volunteers and others. Otherwise, unless you were going to sign up to theology school you really had to work at the networking. Still, the talks did inspire.

The next available Sunday we visited a church that has stripped its language back so completely to get rid of references to God, adopting a language that would not cause people who have had terrible and oppressive church experiences to have heart palpitations. I get that. But I miss the connection to the millennia-old faith, and this makes me feel disconnected to the greater story. We haven’t ruled the community out as a possible home for us as the children’s service was brilliant and our kiddo loved it. And being summer it’s hard to get a full picture of much of anything with people being away. So we’ll come back to that.

This past Sunday we visited a Baptist church. Yup. But get this – the minister was a woman! And get THIS: she was a lesbian. The church has a banner outside welcoming refugees and they regularly take part in campaigns promoting equality across the board. There were grey heads all over that place, listening to this queer woman talk about Jesus. It was paradigm shifting. They have taken their hymns (which I can only take so much of generally) and written new ones that talk about gospel social justice themes. They are much more of the church I grew up with, minus the divisive and judgemental garbage that saw so many of us leave. We will have to see what this means for our family however, as they didn’t have a children’s program for 4 year olds, and while G did really well sitting through the service it may not last. Rob also misses a more enthusiastic worship style. So again, we’ll see where we are led to settle for now.

Overall, it has been good to see glimmers – not glimmers really – more like beacons of hope here in my mother’s state of birth. I have my own prejudices against the south which I will readily admit to, but I also love the south, much like my complicated relationship with my mom I guess.

I’ll leave this video link here for anyone interested in one of these beacons of hope I’ve encountered. He happens to be pastor of a church in my mom’s hometown. I’m sure she’d have diverging ideas about him, but he gives me hope for a movement I can link arms with here in this time to see the Kingdom come. Check it out if you’re interested. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTtRk8np7S4&feature=youtu.be

Finding a spiritual ‘home’ stateside

Thoughts on America, so far

Two and a half weeks have passed so far in our settling into life in ‘murica. It doesn’t feel like it’s really hit yet because life hasn’t had much chance to normalise so far. That and I’m still doing stuff like spelling things with s’s instead of z’s (zed’s, not zee’s) and too many u’s. And our daughter has had a few moments of homesickness which is absolutely heartbreaking. It’s summer break here now though so she won’t get into any real routine til late August, so we’ll just have to get by til then and hope that the incredible heat doesn’t stave off adventure. It’s hard to get outside much because it’s just too darn hot.

Driving around though I have had just a few observations. Since leaving NC 13 years ago, having lived here the 6 months before moving to the UK, I can see that there are positive changes. I’ve seen a lot more healthy food and variety available at the grocery stores (unfortunately it’s also very expensive). I’ve also seen a reasonable sized offering of authentic Mexican food ingredients (not just taco kits) in typical grocery stores in our suburban area outside of Raleigh.

I have also seen fewer Trump stickers than I had braced for (only two so far), possibly due to being inside of Wake County for the most part, but we have taken a couple long road trips. I am sure they are waiting out there for me somewhere en force though. Maybe on our epic road trip in August through Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri and Kentucky.

During our trips to the Appalachians and to Atlanta, we have driven though a few places where I noted a strong Hispanic presence, as evidenced by signs written in Spanish or people we encountered at stops. Thirteen years ago I was hard pressed to find acceptable Mexican food (coming from a town of migrant workers in California, I like to think I know Mexican food fairly well) let alone encountering very many Hispanic communities. But this time around, many of these pockets of Hispanics were in more rural areas, making me wonder about the feelings of those who have lived long term in these areas in seeing the demographic change. I wonder if they felt afraid and responded by tribally to keep out the outsiders. I thought about the rhetoric of Trump and his colleagues and how this has spoken to people seemingly in these types of settings who are pulling up the bridges to keep themselves safe.

Being from a pretty diverse area with a large Mexican and Mexican-American population I can’t imagine having this response to another group of humans entering my community, but scientifically I can understand that it’s evolutionary to react the way they have. And it’s something I want to understand and help overcome. I hope that these specific communities have dealt with it much more graciously than I’ve reckoned, and wouldn’t that be something to learn from.

I can’t say that I feel like I’m in a ‘honeymoon period’ like I’ve been warned of in dealing with reverse culture shock. But I do wonder if, due to our current lifestyles of no jobs and not getting deeply embedded yet into a community, we are experiencing a very surface understanding of American culture not unlike a tourist’s own experience. Because so far everyone is lovely, and the country is beautiful and inviting. But it does feel like there’s an anvil hanging overhead just waiting for the moment to drop, bringing a curtain down that’s covering up a whole lot of garbage.

 

 

Thoughts on America, so far